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Lessons from the Chile mine rescue

posted 14 Oct 2010, 14:12 by Mpelembe Admin   [ updated 14 Oct 2010, 14:17 ]
The dramatic rescue of the Chilean miners can be a lesson for businesses in how to deal with high risk situations.
USA-COMPANYUS - As the celebrations continue for the miners rescued from the collapsed Chilean mine, there are also lessons to be learned from the tragedy.

Companies around the world face unexpected disasters, like the collapse of the mine, and being prepared is essential. Maintaining leadership and organization is also key, says PWC risk consultant Carlos Castillo:

 CARLOS CASTILLO, SENIOR ADVISOR FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT, PWC,  SAYING:

"In this case it was the shift foreman who turned out being the leader and organized them and was able to do what is necessary to make sure that not just physically but emotionally, mentally that they were able to survive through this ordeal."

Keeping the lines of communication open was also an important lesson displayed in this situation.

Contrast that with the case of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. BP's leadership was harshly criticized for their communication early on, which created doubt management was on top of the situation - but in this case, communication was a clear priority.

CARLOS CASTILLO, SENIOR ADVISOR FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT, PWC,  SAYING:

"Whether it's communicating with internally, with internal stakeholders, or communicating outside, and that includes public information communicating with the families, clearly the families were involved. The families of the trapped miners were there and they were kept in the loop as much as possible. Those are all key lessons I believe and it's not just something that could be done on an ad hoc basis. "

Now out of the mine, the 33 are celebrities facing the media- with new opportunities from advertising deals to book and film contracts coming their way.

That newfound celebrity status may put a human face on the risks industrial companies face while digging deep for future growth.

Bobbi Rebell, Reuters

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